Julia Ganz selected as American Neurosastroenterology and Motility Society Young Investigator

Published September 5, 2017

Julia Ganz, assistant professor in the MSU College of Natural Science's Department of Integrative Biology, was selected as an ANMS Young Investigator for the 2017/18 academci year.

Julia Ganz, assistant professor in Michigan State University’s Department of Integrative Biology, was selected for the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society’s (ANMS) Young Investigator Award for the 2017/18 academic year.

Each year, the ANMS selects 15 scientists from a competitive pool of gastroenterology fellows, medical and Ph.D. students, postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty in the early stages of their career for the award. Winners were invited to participate in the Young Investigator Forum in August, which was held simultaneously with an ANMS postgraduate clinical practice course.

“I was excited to receive the ANMS Young Investigator Award this year,” Ganz said. “This award gave me the opportunity to meet world-renowned faculty and the next generation of scientists in the field of Neurogastroenterology and to discuss scientific ideas, research goals and grant applications.”

The award sponsored Ganz’s travel and lodging to the forum where she met with other young investigators and established faculty in a one-on-one mentoring program. Ganz also gave an oral presentation of her novel research on the enteric nervous system and its regulation of gut motility.

“Work in my lab centers around investigating which signals coordinate the development and regeneration of the enteric nervous system using zebrafish as a model system,” Ganz said. “It was great to present the zebrafish as an important new model system for gut research, which is unique among this group of researchers, allowing me to make valuable connections and receive important feedback on the current and future projects of my group.”

“We are very pleased to see this well-deserved national recognition of Julia’s past work and future potential,” said Thomas Getty, chair of the Department of Integrative Biology in the College of Natural Science. “This recognition will facilitate the continued success of Julia’s pioneering research here at MSU on the development of the enteric nervous system and the discovery of mechanisms underlying disorders.”

The ANMS was established in 1980 with the goal of improving research, education, training and care for patients with neruogatroenterology and gastrointestinal motility and functional GI disorders. The ANMS Young Investigator Forum aims to support these goals by providing interaction among young and experienced scientists, developing leadership skills and fostering academic growth and development.