Gemma Reguera elected fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology

  • Mar 5, 2019
  • American Academy of Microbiology Fellow, Award, Faculty
  • Homepage News, Alumni, Faculty & Staff, Research, College of Natural Science, Microbiology
Image of Gemma Reguera in her lab
MSU microbiologist Gemma Reguera has been elected a 2019 fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology in recognition of her contributions as a scholar, educator and communicator of distinction and accomplishment. Photo courtesy of University Communications.

Michigan State University microbiologist Gemma Reguera has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM), the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM).

AAM fellows are elected for their excellence, originality and leadership in the microbiological sciences. Fellows are eminent leaders in the field and are relied upon for authoritative advice and insight on critical issues in microbiology.

Reguera, a professor in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (MMG) in the MSU College of Natural Science, was recognized specifically by AAM as a “scholar, educator and communicator of distinction and accomplishment.”

“Dr. Reguera has an exceptional record of accomplishment in research, education and outreach,” said Vic DiRita, Rudolph Hugh Professor and MMG chair. “While recognizing her important contributions, her election as a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology clearly distinguishes Dr. Reguera as a leader in the field of microbial sciences.”

Reguera’s research focuses on the adaptive responses of microbes to their natural environment and exploits this knowledge to find novel biotechnological applications for microbial processes. She is known internationally for her basic and applied research in electromicrobiology, a new subfield in microbiology that investigates the physiology and applications of electrically active microorganisms. MSU named Reguera Innovator of the Year in 2016 for her research designing novel electrochemical bioreactors that can convert low-cost substrates, such as corn stover, and industrial wastes into useful end products, such as biofuels and chemical precursors.

“I am humbled to be recognized by the Academy as a leader in microbial science and for my efforts as an educator and communicator,” Reguera said. “It is a recognition that I share with current and past members of my laboratory and the wonderful colleagues I have been fortunate to have throughout my career. I am particularly grateful to my chairperson, Dr. DiRita, who led the nomination, and to my colleagues in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Michigan State. But most importantly, I share this with my wonderful husband (and colleague), Kaz Kashefi, and my son, Dario, who are the forces driving all my pursuits.”

The American Academy of Microbiology elected 109 new fellows in 2019. The cohort includes fellows from France, Ireland, the Netherlands, Israel, Korea, Taiwan and China.

AAM Fellows are elected annually through a highly selective, peer-review process based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology. There are currently more than 2,400 fellows from around the globe, representing all subspecialties of the microbial sciences and involvement in basic and applied research, teaching, public health, industry and government service.   

As a newly elected fellow, Reguera will be recognized at a reception during the American Society of Microbiology's ASM Microbe 2019 conference, June 20-24, in San Francisco.

The American Society for Microbiology is the world's oldest and largest life science organization. The mission of the American Academy of Microbiology within ASM is to recognize excellence in the microbiological sciences; foster awareness of advances in microbiology and the potential contributions of these advances to human welfare; provide accurate, science-based information about critical issues in microbiology; and identify and convene experts to consider and to advise on issues related to microbiology.

 

Banner image: Reguera’s research focuses on the adaptive responses of microbes to their natural environment and exploits this knowledge to find novel biotechnological applications for microbial processes. She is known internationally for her basic and applied research in electromicrobiology, a new subfield in microbiology that investigates the physiology and applications of electrically active microorganisms. Illustration courtesy of University Communications.